I obtained into one argument about why right here in Brazil castle don't use letters to name the notes, lock use execute re mi fa solar si, is it wrong to name notes v letters? ns tried to research about Solmization yet I didn't really understand it, I'm simply curious, sorry if the a dumb question.

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There isn't yes, really a "wrong" or "right" way, they're just various words for the very same thing in different languages. The concern is favor "is it wrong to contact water 'agua'?"

Generally speaking germanic languages use letters and Romance languages usage solfege.


agreed! the is what a tried come say to mine uncle once we whereby arguing, however he preserved saying that do re mi fa solar si is the correct means and that using the letter is simply an abbreviation, but thanks anyway for answering it.


do re mi fa sol si

I guess friend left out "la".

But, friend left me through a question: ns learned to contact B (or "7") ti in solfege, no "si". And also in "chromatic solfege", I thought "sol sharp" was "si". For this reason if you usage "si" because that "7", then what carry out you speak to "sol sharp"? Or probably you don't usage chromatic alterations in your solfege system?

I have another question for anyone: anytime I have seen the surname of a key, e.g. In ingredient titles, e.g. "Symphony in D minor" or "Etude in B major", it's always to be a letter name, never ever a solfege name. I.e. I've never viewed a title choose "Sonata in La major", no issue what language the composer is from. Why is that?


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I have one more question for anyone: at any time I have seen the name of a key, e.g. In ingredient titles, e.g. "Symphony in D minor" or "Etude in B major", it's always been a letter name, never a solfege name. I.e. I've never seen a title like "Sonata in La major", no issue what language the composer is from. Why is that?

It go exist, for example there is Symphonie no 9 en ré mineur by Beethoven. Google the ;-)


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I.e. I've never watched a title prefer "Sonata in La major", no issue what language the composer is from. Why is that?

That would be since you were reading around these piece in English, or one more Germanic language! What problem is the language gift spoken/written at the moment, no the language the composer that the job-related spoke. We still contact French publications "books" when we talk about them in English, right? simply as French-speakers contact English-language books livres.


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But, girlfriend left me through a question: i learned to speak to B (or "7") ti in solfege, no "si". And also in "chromatic solfege", I assumed "sol sharp" was "si". So if you usage "si" for "7", climate what perform you speak to "sol sharp"? Or perhaps you don't usage chromatic alterations in her solfege system?

Do Di Re Ri Mi Fa Fi so Si La Li Ti device is just really supplied in movable do solfege (and is a fairly modern-day invention). If you usage the solfege syllables because that fixed keep in mind names, climate you merely say Do# Re# Fa# Sol# La# instead of Di Ri Fi Si Li

Si was the initial name, but when chromatic movable carry out solfege was designed (which is a much later invention), that was changed to Ti, so the it doesn't obtain mixed up through the #5 scale degree, and the device stays reasonably consistent.

Originally, in the hexachord system, every sharp was called "Mi" and also every level was dubbed "Fa" (at the very least according to early on Music Sources). But earlier then, the entirety tonal device was nice different, and keys as we understand them weren't yes, really a thing.

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I have one more question for anyone: whenever I have seen the name of a key, e.g. In ingredient titles, e.g. "Symphony in D minor" or "Etude in B major", it's always to be a letter name, never a solfege name. I.e. I've never seen a title like "Sonata in La major", no issue what language the composer is from. Why is that?

That's due to the fact that the names are interpreted (well, actually, the piece don't yes, really have appropriate names and we simply specify the key and the composition form to distinguish them from various other compositions from the same composer). If you to be in Italy or France or Russia or any country whereby they usage solfege instead of letter names, the exact same pieces would be dubbed "Symphony in Re minor" or "Etude in Si major".