Sign up for Scientific American’s complimentary newsletters."data-newsletterpromo_article-image="https://static.snucongo.org/sciam/cache/file/4641809D-B8F1-41A3-9E5A87C21ADB2FD8_source.png"data-newsletterpromo_article-button-text="Sign Up"data-newsletterpromo_article-button-link="https://www.snucongo.org/page/newsletter-sign-up/?origincode=2018_sciam_ArticlePromo_NewsletterSignUp"name="articleBody" itemprop="articleBody">

Deciding whether a problem is, say, steel, brick, timber or plastic is easy--but no on the atomic scale, which lacks information around such everyday characteristics. Making use of an atomic-force microscope (AFM), however, an worldwide team that physicists has occurred a method of atom "fingerprinting" that can determine the chemical identification of individual atoms on a surface mixed with all of them.


This is a preview. Make a choice below to accessibility this issue.Already have access? authorize in.

You are watching: The fingerprint of an atom is seen in its


Having trouble accessing this article? please visit our FAQ web page for an ext information


*

Digital IssueRead virtual or download a PDF that this issue.$7.99
Print & complete Archive SubscriptionThis digital concern plus 12 brand-new issues (in print, digital and tablet computer formats) plus archive accessibility to 1845.$99.00
Add to Cart
More in the June 2007 concern of scientific American
View complete Contents
Visit our Librarian Gateway for extr information on to buy a website license come this and also other products
*
rights & Permissions

Support scientific research Journalism

Discover world-changing science. Explore our digital archive back to 1845, including write-ups by an ext than 150 Nobel prize winners.

Subscribe Now!

*

Scientific American is component of Springer Nature, which owns or has commercial connections with thousands of clinical publications (many of them have the right to be found at www.springernature.com/us). Scientific American maintains a strict plan of editorial independence in reporting breakthroughs in science to our readers.

© 2021 clinical American, a department of Springer Nature America, Inc.

All civil liberties Reserved.


Scroll to Top
*

Support science journalism.



Thanks for analysis Scientific American. Expertise awaits.

See Subscription Options

Already a subscriber? sign in.

See more: Convert 350 Mm Equals How Many Inches Converter, Convert 350 Millimeters To Inches

Thanks for reading Scientific American. Create your cost-free account or authorize in to continue.