*



You are watching: What is the meaning of so mote it be

*
*
*
*

about UsMembership InfoMasonic EducationChapter (Valley) Clubs & OrganizationsMedia & PublicationsScottish Rite JournalPhilanthropiesRiteCare Scottish Rite Childhood Language ProgramAbout the RiteCare SRCLPScholarshipsGrantsGivingWays to GiveCampaigns & ProgramsDonor RecognitionOur FoundationsOur MuseumPlanning your VisitLibraryArchives
we are open for travellers & tours! Please examine out our “Planning your Visit” web page for more information. ** Per current D.C. Guidance, as of Nov. 22, 2021, masks no much longer are compelled in the home of the Temple—except in ours libraries. **

Home » Scottish Rite Myths and Facts » Why perform Freemasons finish their prayers through the expression “So mote it be”?

Why carry out Freemasons end their prayers v the expression “So mote the be”?




See more: How Much Does A Radish Weigh, How Much Is A Bunch Of Radishes

It is customary in modern English to end prayers through a hearty “Amen,” a word meaning “So be it.” the is a Latin word acquired from the Hebrew word
*
meaning “certainly.” thus a congregation speak “Amen” is literally speak “So be it.” the word mote is an antiquated verb that means “may” or “might,” and also traces back to Old English. The expression “So mote the be” means “So may it be,” i m sorry is the exact same as “So be it.”Now that we’ve created the equivalence that “Amen” and “So mote it be,” the concern remains, “Why carry out Masons end their prayers v ‘So mote the be’?” The answer goes ago to the Regius Poem of around 1390 AD, the oldest known Masonic document (now housed in the brothers Museum, London). It is among the Old charges or Gothic Constitution supplied by beforehand Freemasons to control their trade. It has actually a legendary history, regulation to overview the Mason trade and rules that manners and also moral conduct. The city ends famously through this couplet:
*
Caption: A information from a facsimile showing the closeup of the door couplet the The Regius Poem (Masonic book Club, 1970)Amen! Amen! therefore mote the be! for this reason say we all for charity.Thus Freemasons today end their prayers the same method they go in 1390. The next time she in lodge and say “So mote the be” after the chaplain finishes a prayer, remember the you are continuing a 600-year-old Masonic tradition.From the March/April 2009 Scottish Rite Journal